Stories of Victims

Cover Story Mind Games New on the Internet: a community of people who believe the government is beaming voices into their minds. They may be crazy, but the Pentagon has pursued a weapon that can do just that. Washington Post, By Sharon Weinberger, Sunday, January 14, 2007; Page W22 If Harlan Girard is crazy, he doesn’t act the part. He is standing just where he said he would be, below the Philadelphia train station’s World War II memorial – a soaring statue of a winged angel embracing a fallen combatant, as if lifting him to heaven. Girard is wearing pressed khaki pants, expensive-looking leather loafers and a crisp blue button-down. He looks like a local businessman dressed for a casual Friday – a local businessman with a wickedly dark sense of humor, which had become apparent when he said to look for him beneath “the angel sodomizing a dead soldier.” At 70, he appears robust and healthy – not the slightest bit disheveled or unusual-looking. He is also carrying a bag. Girard’s description of himself is matter-of-fact, until he explains what’s in the bag: documents he believes prove that the government is attempting to control his mind. He carries that black, weathered bag everywhere he goes. “Every time I go out, I’m prepared to come home and find everything is stolen,” he says. The bag aside, Girard appears intelligent and coherent. At a table in front of Dunkin’ Donuts inside the train station, Girard opens the bag and pulls out a thick stack of documents, carefully labeled and sorted with yellow sticky notes bearing neat block print. The documents are an authentic-looking mix of news stories, articles culled from military journals and even some declassified national security documents that do seem to show that the U.S. government has attempted to develop weapons that send voices into people’s heads. “It’s undeniable that the technology exists,” Girard says, “but if you go to the police and say, ‘I’m hearing voices,’ they’re going to lock you up for psychiatric evaluation.” The thing that’s missing from his bag – the lack of which makes it hard to prove he isn’t crazy – is even a single document that would buttress the implausible notion that the government is currently targeting a large group of American citizens with mind-control technology. The only direct evidence for that, Girard admits, lies with alleged victims such as himself. And of those, there are many. It’s 9:01 P.M. when the first person speaks during the Saturday conference call. Unsure whether anyone else is on the line yet, the female caller throws out the first question: “You got gang stalking or V2K?” she asks no one in particular. There’s a short, uncomfortable pause. “V2K, really bad. 24-7,” a man replies. “Gang stalking,” another woman says. “Oh, yeah, join the club,” yet another man replies. The members of this confessional “club” are not your usual victims. This isn’t a group for alcoholics, drug addicts or survivors of childhood abuse; the people connecting on the call are self-described victims of mind control – people who believe they have been targeted by a secret government program that tracks them around the clock, using technology to probe and control their minds. The callers frequently refer to themselves as TIs, which is short for Targeted Individuals, and talk about V2K – the official military abbreviation stands for “voice to skull” and denotes weapons that beam voices or sounds into the head. In their esoteric lexicon, “gang stalking” refers to the belief that they are being followed and harassed: by neighbors, strangers or colleagues who are agents for the government. A few more “hellos” are exchanged, interrupted by beeps signaling late arrivals: Bill from Columbus, Barbara from Philadelphia, Jim from California and a dozen or so others. Derrick Robinson, the conference call moderator, calls order. “It’s five after 9,” says Robinson, with the sweetly reasonable intonation of a late-night radio host. “Maybe we should go ahead and start.” The idea of a group of people convinced they are targeted by weapons that can invade their minds has become a cultural joke, shorthanded by the image of solitary lunatics wearing tinfoil hats to deflect invisible mind beams. “Tinfoil hat,” says Wikipedia, has become “a popular stereotype and term of derision; the phrase serves as a byword for paranoia and is associated with conspiracy theorists.” In 2005, a group of MIT students conducted a formal study using aluminum foil and radio signals. Their surprising finding: Tinfoil hats may actually amplify radio frequency signals. Of course, the tech students meant the study as a joke. But during the Saturday conference call, the subject of aluminum foil is deadly serious. The MIT study had prompted renewed debate; while a few TIs realized it was a joke at their expense, some saw the findings as an explanation for why tinfoil didn’t seem to stop the voices. Others vouched for the material. “Tinfoil helps tremendously,” reports one conference call participant, who describes wrapping it around her body underneath her clothing. “Where do you put the tinfoil?” a man asks. “Anywhere, everywhere,” she replies. “I even put it in a hat.” A TI in an online mind-control forum recommends a Web site called “Block EMF” (as in electromagnetic frequencies), which advertises a full line of clothing, including aluminum-lined boxer shorts described as a “sheer, comfortable undergarment you can wear over your regular one to shield yourself from power lines and computer electric fields, and microwave, radar, and TV radiation.” Similarly, a tinfoil hat disguised as a regular baseball cap is “smart and subtle.” For all the scorn, the ranks of victims – or people who believe they are victims – are speaking up. In the course of the evening, there are as many as 40 clicks from people joining the call, and much larger numbers participate in the online forum, which has 143 members. A note there mentioning interest from a journalist prompted more than 200 e-mail responses. Until recently, people who believe the government is beaming voices into their heads would have added social isolation to their catalogue of woes. But now, many have discovered hundreds, possibly thousands, of others just like them all over the world. Web sites dedicated to electronic harassment and gang stalking have popped up in India, China, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom, Russia and elsewhere. Victims have begun to host support meetings in major cities, including Washington. Favorite topics at the meetings include lessons on how to build shields (the proverbial tinfoil hats), media and PR training, and possible legal strategies for outlawing mind control. The biggest hurdle for TIs is getting people to take their concerns seriously. A proposal made in 2001 by Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) to ban “psychotronic weapons” (another common term for mind-control technology) was hailed by TIs as a great step forward. But the bill was widely derided by bloggers and columnists and quickly dropped. Doug Gordon, Kucinich’s spokesman, would not discuss mind control other than to say the proposal was part of broader legislation outlawing weapons in space. The bill was later reintroduced, minus the mind control. “It was not the concentration of the legislation, which is why it was tightened up and redrafted,” was all Gordon would say. Unable to garner much support from their elected representatives, TIs have started their own PR campaign. And so, last spring, the Saturday conference calls centered on plans to hold a rally in Washington. A 2005 attempt at a rally drew a few dozen people and was ultimately rained out; the TIs were determined to make another go of it. Conversations focused around designing T-shirts, setting up congressional appointments, fundraising, creating a new Web site and formalizing a slogan. After some debate over whether to focus on gang stalking or mind control, the group came up with a compromise slogan that covered both: “Freedom From Covert Surveillance and Electronic Harassment.” Conference call moderator Robinson, who says his gang stalking began when he worked at the National Security Agency in the 1980s, offers his assessment of the group’s prospects: Maybe this rally wouldn’t produce much press, but it’s a first step. “I see this as a movement,” he says. “We’re picking up people all the time.”

Webaddresses of Victims and Reporters -

http://mindcontrol.com.cn

http://www.mindjustice.org/ http://web.iol.cz/mhzzrz/ http://www.mikrowellenterror.de/ http://mindcontrol.twoday.net/

http://blog.sina.com.cn/u/1379229175

http://www.fnk123.com/

http://video.sina.com.cn/v/b/62722790-2404751281.html

http://tieba.baidu.com/p/1635867706

http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_a4253c120100yvk1.html

http://bbs.dzwww.com/thread-23979783-1-1.html

http://club.china.com/data/thread/1011/2732/25/13/8_1.html

http://bbs.cntv.cn/thread-27332588-1-1.html

http://www.deyi.com/thread-3944696-1-1.html

http://club.women.sohu.com/fun_pics/thread/!275560aef7fc30b5/p9

http://mcvictimsworld.ning.com/profile/wixngpynodinb

http://peacepink.ning.com/

http://mcvictimsworld.ning.com

http://www.wanttoknow.info/mindcontrolinformation

http://www.mindcontrol-victims.eu/

 http://www.wanttoknow.info/

http://www.surveillanceissues.com/

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article13845.htm

http://mindcontrol.twoday.net

http://www.cheniere.org/

http://www.geocities.jp/techhanzainetinfo/

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Campus/2289/webpage.htm)

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